Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown

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University of Virginia Press #ad - Pocahontas may be the most famous native american who ever lived, but during the settlement of Jamestown, and for two centuries afterward, the great chiefs Powhatan and Opechancanough were the subjects of considerably more interest and historical documentation than the young woman. This important book at last reconstructs the other side of the story.

As the 400th anniversary of jamestown’s founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. It was opechancanough who captured the foreign captain "Chawnzmit"—John Smith. Opechancanough, presented smith to his elder brother, who was no cannibal and knew the world was flat, the paramount chief Powhatan.

Within a few decades, and against their will, his people would be subjects of the British Crown. Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. Thinking he had made an ally, the chief finally released Smith. The powhatans were a nonliterate people, so we have had to rely until now on the white settlers for our conceptions of the Jamestown experiment.

Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown #ad - The chief, who took the name of his tribe as his throne name his personal name was Wahunsenacawh, negotiated with Smith over a lavish feast and opened the town to him, leading Smith to meet, among others, Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life.

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The Powhatan Indians of Virginia: Their Traditional Culture The Civilization of the American Indian Series Book 193

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University of Oklahoma Press #ad - Among the aspects of powhatan life that helen rountree describes in vivid detail are hunting and agriculture, and even village games, warfare and treatment of prisoners, initiation rites, the nature of rulers, music, religion, territorial claims, medicine, physical appearance and dress, education of youths, construction of houses and towns, family and social structure and customs, and dance.

Rountree’s is the first book-length treatment of this fascinating culture, which included one of the most complex political organizations in native North American and which figured prominently in early American history.

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Salem-Village Witchcraft: A Documentary Record of Local Conflict in Colonial New England

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Northeastern University Press #ad - Few episodes in american history have aroused such intense and continued interest as the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials. This volume draws exclusively on primary documents to reveal the underlying conflicts and tensions that caused that small, agricultural settlement to explode with such dramatic force.

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The True Story of Pocahontas: The Other Side of History

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Fulcrum Publishing #ad - The book will be published in 2007, in connection with the 400th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Colony. The true story of pocahontas is the first public publication of the Powhatan perspective that has been maintained and passed down from generation to generation within the Mattaponi Tribe, and the first written history of Pocahontas by her own people.

The mattaponi indian tribe, was one of the original core tribes of the Powhatan Chiefdom, along with the Pamunkey Tribe, which the English colonists encountered in the 17th century while establishing Jamestown. The true story of pocahontas: the other side of history incorporates the sacred oral history of the Mattaponi that has been passed down to Lin “Little Bear” since his childhood, by his father, the late Mattaponi Chief Webster “Little Eagle” Custalow; his uncle, the late Mattaponi Chief O.

The True Story of Pocahontas: The Other Side of History #ad - For nearly 400 years people have heard the Euro-American rendition and interpretation of events that transpired between the English colonists and the Powhatan Indians. Custalow; and grandfather, the late Mattaponi Chief George F. Custalow; and those that came before. T.

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The River Between Penguin African Writers Series Book 4

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Penguin Classics #ad - With more than 1, 700 titles, penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Faced with a choice between an alluring new religion and their own ancestral customs, the Gikuyu people are torn between those who fear the unknown and those who see beyond it.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

The River Between Penguin African Writers Series Book 4 #ad - . The river between explores life in the mountains of Kenya during the early days of white settlement. A 50th-anniversary edition of one of the most powerful novels by the great Kenyan author and Nobel Prize nominee A legendary work of African literature, this moving and eye-opening novel lucidly captures the drama of a people and culture whose world has been overturned.

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Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper

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Hill and Wang #ad - The true history of a legendary american folk heroin the 1820s, Rhode Island, a fellow named Sam Patch grew up in Pawtucket, working there when he wasn't drinking as a mill hand for one of America's new textile companies. Johnson gives this deceptively simple story all its deserved richness, revealing in its characters and social settings a virtual microcosm of Jacksonian America.

. When in 1827 he repeated the stunt in paterson, New Jersey, another mill town, an even larger audience gathered to cheer on the daredevil they would call the "Jersey Jumper. Inevitably, he went to niagara falls, where in 1829 he jumped not once but twice in front of thousands who had paid for a good view.

Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper #ad - The distinguished social historian Paul E. Sam made a name for himself one day by jumping seventy feet into the tumultuous waters below Pawtucket Falls. He also relates the real jumper to the mythic sam patch who turned up as a daring moral hero in the works of Hawthorne and Melville, in London plays and pantomimes, and in the spotlight with Davy Crockett—a Sam Patch who became the namesake of Andrew Jackson's favorite horse.

In his shrewd and powerful analysis, Johnson casts new light on aspects of American society that we may have overlooked or underestimated. This is innovative American history at its best.

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The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War New Narratives in American History

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Oxford University Press #ad - As he tells this compelling story, barney offers new insights into the ways that selective memory informs history; through Lenoir's life, readers learn how individual choices can transform abstract historical processes into concrete actions. After the war, lenoir, its causes, like many others, refashioning his memory and beliefs in an attempt to make sense of the war, embraced the cult of the Lost Cause, and its consequences.

While some southerners sank into depression, or fiercely opposed the new order, aligned with the victors, Lenoir withdrew to his acreage in the North Carolina mountains. In the making of a Confederate, William L. Despite the advances of the civil rights movement, many white southerners cling to the faded glory of a romanticized Confederate past.

But when the war erupted in 1860, Lenoir found another escape route--he joined the Confederate army, an experience that would radically transform his ideals. Barney focuses on the life of one man, Walter Lenoir of North Carolina, to examine the origins of southern white identity alongside its myriad ambiguities and complexities.

The Making of a Confederate: Walter Lenoir's Civil War New Narratives in American History #ad - Born into a wealthy slaveholding family, Lenoir abhorred the institution, opposed secession, and planned to leave his family to move to Minnesota, in the free North. There, he pursued his own vision of the South's future, one that called for greater self-sufficiency and a more efficient use of the land.

For lenoir and many fellow Confederates, the war never really ended.

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The Market Revolution in America: Liberty, Ambition, and the Eclipse of the Common Good Cambridge Essential Histories

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Cambridge University Press #ad - The mass industrial democracy that is the modern United States bears little resemblance to the simple agrarian republic that gave it birth. The resulting tangled frameworks of democracy and capitalism still dominate the world as it responds to the panic of 2008. In this book, john lauritz Larson explores the lure of market capitalism and the beginnings of industrialization in the United States.

The exhilaration - and pain - they endured have been repeated in nearly every part of the globe. His research combines an appreciation for enterprise and innovation with recognition of negative and unanticipated consequences of the transition to capitalism and relates economic change directly to American freedom and self-determination, links that remain entirely relevant today.

The Market Revolution in America: Liberty, Ambition, and the Eclipse of the Common Good Cambridge Essential Histories #ad - The market revolution is the reason for this dramatic - and ironic - metamorphosis. Early americans experienced what we now call 'modernization'. Born of freedom and ambition, the market revolution in America fed on democracy and individualism even while it generated inequality, dependency, and unimagined wealth and power.

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Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War's Most Persistent Myth Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - But as Kevin M. Levin argues in this carefully researched book, such claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the war itself. Moreover, levin shows that belief in the existence of black Confederate soldiers largely originated in the 1970s, a period that witnessed both a significant shift in how Americans remembered the Civil War and a rising backlash against African Americans' gains in civil rights and other realms.

Levin also investigates the roles that African Americans actually performed in the Confederate army, including personal body servants and forced laborers. Even long after the guns fell silent, confederate veterans and other writers remembered these men as former slaves and not as soldiers, an important reminder that how the war is remembered often runs counter to history.

Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War's Most Persistent Myth Civil War America #ad - . More than 150 years after the end of the civil war, articles, and organizations repeat claims that anywhere between 500 and 100, scores of websites, 000 free and enslaved African Americans fought willingly as soldiers in the Confederate army. Levin explains that imprecise contemporary accounts, poorly understood primary-source material, and other misrepresentations helped fuel the rise of the black Confederate myth.

He demonstrates that regardless of the dangers these men faced in camp, and on the battlefield, on the march, their legal status remained unchanged.

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Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught between Cultures in Early Virginia

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NYU Press #ad - While their knowledge and role in controlling communication gave them status and a degree of power, their relationships with both sides meant that no one trusted them completely. As pocahontas, thomas, and robert collaborated and conspired in carrying messages and trying to smooth out difficulties, Henry, they never knew when they might be caught in the firing line of developing hostilities.

Written by an expert in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century atlantic history, travel accounts, letters, Pocahontas and the English Boys unearths gems from the archives—Henry Spelman’s memoir, and official reports and records of meetings of the governor and council in Virginia—and draws on recent archaeology to share the stories of the young people who were key influencers of their day and who are now set to transform our understanding of early Virginia.

. Pocahontas and the english boys is a riveting seventeenth-century story of intrigue and danger, knowledge and power, and four youths who lived out their lives between cultures. The captivating story of four young people—english and powhatan—who lived their lives between cultures In Pocahontas and the English Boys, the esteemed historian Karen Ordahl Kupperman shifts the lens on the well-known narrative of Virginia’s founding to reveal the previously untold and utterly compelling story of the youths who, often unwillingly, entered into cross-cultural relationships—and became essential for the colony’s survival.

Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught between Cultures in Early Virginia #ad - Here for the first time outside scholarly texts is an accurate portrayal of pocahontas, who ruled over the local tribes, who, Henry Spelman, alongside the never-before-told intertwined stories of Thomas Savage, acted as emissary for her father, from the age of ten, and Robert Poole, young English boys who were forced to live with powerful Indian leaders to act as intermediaries.

Their story gives us unprecedented access to both sides of early Virginia.

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A Land As God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America

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Basic Books #ad - The definitive history of the jamestown colony, the crucible of American historyAlthough it was the first permanent English settlement in North America, Jamestown is too often overlooked in the writing of American history. Founded thirteen years before the Mayflower sailed, Jamestown's courageous settlers have been overshadowed ever since by the pilgrims of Plymouth.

A land as god made it offers the definitive account of the colony that give rise to America. But as historian james horn demonstrates in this vivid and meticulously researched account, Jamestown-not Plymouth-was the true crucible of American history. Jamestown introduced slavery into english-speaking North America; it became the first of England's colonies to adopt a representative government; and it was the site of the first white-Indian clashes over territorial expansion.

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