Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12

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Manik Joshi #ad - Future Continuous Tense4. You should use passive voice when you do not know the active subject. 2. Interrogative Sentences14. When active voice does not sound good. 8. Have/has/had + Past Participle4. Verb + object + infinitive Without 'To'12. There + verb 'be' + Noun + Infinitive13. Auxiliary verb 'be' + Infinitive To + Verb11.

Principal clause + That + Noun Clause Object16. Passive voice is frequently used to describe scientific or mechanical processes6. You can also use passive voice when you want to avoid extra-long subjects. Changing active voice into passive VoiceRule 1:Move the object of the active voice into the position of subject front of the sentence in the passive voice.

Interchange of Active and Passive Voice: Patterns and Examples English Daily Use Book 12 #ad - Put the helping verb in the same tense as the original active sentence. When active subject is obvious. 4. Have/has/had + infinitive To + Verb10 Main verb + Object + Complement8. Auxiliary verb 'be' + -ING Form of Verb3. Future perfect Continuous Tense.

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How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1

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Manik Joshi #ad - Butthis is not hard and fast rule. So, you can use 'and' or 'But' to begin a sentence. They mightbe words formed from verbs, -ed, ending in -ing, -en, etc. Particularly in spoken English, starting a sentence with 'And' or 'But' is common. How to start a sentence -- Using 'AS'As a matter of fact no notice was given to anyone.

As a policeman myself, I am aware of all the laws. As against last time four days, the fair will last for five days this year. As always, he won the match. As an interim arrangement, we directed the authorities not to return the land. As fate would have it, he crossed the international border. As for david, he is doing fine.

How to Start a Sentence: Words to Begin Sentences English Daily Use Book 1 #ad - As he got busy, she picked up his son. As he grew older, he developed his communications skills. As if the bad power situation in the city wasn't enough, the hike in power tariff has come as the last straw for residents. As in the past, party president distanced herself from the government's unpopular decision.

As long as here is violence by unruly mobs, use of police force is inevitable. As often happened, he forgot to send me reply. As part of the deal, they will hand-over control of five west bank towns.

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Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10

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Manik Joshi #ad - Interchange of positive, comparative and superlative degreesexercise - 1exercise - 2sample this:structure 1a -- comparison of actions - ipattern 1:affirmative sentence-ING form of Verb + Verb 'Be' + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of VerbOrIt + Verb 'Be' + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary VerbWriting is as easy as thinking.

Jogging is as easy as exercising. Closing is as easy as opening. Designing is as easy as publishing. It is as easy to write as think. It is as easy to jog as exercise. It is as easy to close as open. It is as easy to design as publish. Pattern 2:negative sentence-ing form of verb + verb 'to be' + not + as + adjective + as + -ing form of verborit + verb 'To Be' + Not + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary VerbStudying is not as easy as playing.

Making Comparisons in English: Similarities, Dissimilarities, Degrees English Daily Use Book 10 #ad - Swimming is not as easy as running. Singing is not as easy as talking. Reading is not as easy as listening. It is not as easy to study as play. It is not as easy to swim as run. It is not as easy to sing as talk.

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Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8

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Manik Joshi #ad - This book covers the following topics:patterns for creating long sentences01 -- using '-ing form of verbs' i02 -- using '-ing form of verbs' ii03 -- using '-ing form of verbs' iii04 -- using 'with + -ing form of verbs'05 -- using 'series'06 -- Using 'From - To'07 -- Using 'Connecting Words or Phrases'08 -- Using 'Parenthesis'09 -- Miscellaneous PatternsSample This:01 -- Using '-ING Form of Verbs' IExample 01:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades, causing agricultural distress and forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work.

Main verb - described-ing form of verbs - causing, forcingExplanation:The ongoing drought in the state is being described as the country's worst in many decades. Drought is causing agricultural distress. Drought is also forcing villagers to move to urban areas looking for work. Example 02:offering huge relief to ten thousand families belonging to the below poverty line category in the state, minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months.

Creating Long Sentences in English: Boost Your Communication Skills English Daily Use Book 8 #ad - Main verb - directed-ing form of verbs - offering, belongingExplanation:Minister directed Power Corporation Limited to waive pending domestic power bills for last 10 months. Minister offered huge relief to ten thousand families. Families belonged to the below poverty line category in the state. Example 03:a deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US, grounding flights, turning highways into the ice rinks and knocking out power to tens of thousands preparing for the New Year holiday.

Main verb - blanketed-ing form of verbs - grounding, knocking, turning, preparingExplanation:A deadly winter storm blanketed a huge swath of the US.

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Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23

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Manik Joshi #ad - But as most people avoid 'excessive' use of prepositions at the end of sentences, you can follow suit, and may use them only when they give strength to your language. Some words on, over, off, etc. May be used as both prepositions and adverbs. The word preposition expresses "position before" so it is improper to place a preposition at the end! This is, however, not a rule.

Using a preposition at the end of a sentence is not grammatically incorrect. As most of the people are averse to the idea of using prepositions at the end of sentences, they even don't use these words as adverbs at the end of sentences. Actually, it is a myth that you shouldn't use preposition at the end of a sentence.

Ending Sentences with Prepositions: Useful Tips English Daily Use Book 23 #ad - A preposition should be placed before a noun or a pronoun. This book covers the following topics: a big mythlist of prepositionsending a sentence with a preposition - about, of, to, upon, in, from, out, into, against, on, for, at, by, with - example sentenceswhen to end a sentence with a prepositionsituation - 01 - Interrogative SentencesSituation - 02 - Passive Voice SentencesSituation - 03 - Infinitive StructuresSituation - 04 - Relative ClausesSituation - 05 - Phrasal VerbsHow to Avoid Ending a Sentence with a PrepositionOption - 01 - Restructuring the SentenceOption - 02 - Using a Different WordAvoid Unnecessary Use of PrepositionsAdditional ExamplesExercises: 1A and 1BExercises: 2A and 2BSample This:A Big MythIt is said we should avoid ending a sentence with a preposition.

Sometimes, using preposition at the end of a sentence seems better than using it in the middle or beginning of a sentence. Ending a sentence with a preposition - aboutan ad agency's job is to take a brand to consumers and communicate the proposition well to them, so that they understand what the brand is all about.

Could you tell me what he was on about?For last 5 years, he has been part of the corruption in our country that we are angry about.

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English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20

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Manik Joshi #ad - Always use 'may not'difference between 'May' and 'Might'Note: 'Might' is the past equivalent of 'may' in indirect speech. But it is used in the same way as 'may' to talk about the present or future. May' denotes more possibility/probability'might' denotes less possibility/probabilityIt may rain tomorrow Perhaps a 75% chance - More possibleIt might rain tomorrow Perhaps a 50% chance - Less possible'Might' also denotes 'would perhaps'You might attract President's attention later.

Perhaps you would attract. He might have to go Perhaps he had to go. Might' is frequently used In conditional sentencesIf I pursued studies further, I might learn more. If i had pursued studies further, I might have learned more. Might' has limitations while 'asking permission''Might' is very polite and formal.

English Modal Auxiliary Verbs: May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, Shall, Should, Must, Need English Daily Use Book 20 #ad - Always use 'may'Never use 'might not' to refuse permission. It is mostly used in indirect questions. I wonder if I might work on your computer. Note: 'maybe' is an adverb. Modal auxiliary verb or 'modal verb' or 'modalauxiliary' is a verb that is used with another verb not a modal verbto express ability, necessity, possibility, intention, obligation, permission, probability, etc.

English modal auxiliary verbs -may, obligation | shall, surprise, probability, obligation, will, could, obligation, suggestion, would are used to express- action in future, suggestion, can, dare | different patterns and examples | may andmight are used to express- possibility, might, condition |will, usedto, should are used to express- action infuture, compulsion, probability in present and future | can, could are used to express-ability, oughtto, present habit, must, need, compulsion, recommendation, request, should, possibility, would, importance or purpose | need is used toexpress necessity | usedto is used to express- past habit | oughttois used to express- probability, shall, advise |dare is used to express- be brave enough toSample This:Modal Auxiliary Verb -- May and Might'May' and 'Might' are used to show Possibility and Probability'May' and 'Might' are used to ask for Permission'May' is used to give or refuse PermissionSome Important Uses of 'May' and 'Might'To say what the purpose of something isWe eat that we may live.

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Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15

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Manik Joshi #ad - Negative pattern -subject + auxiliary verb 'do/does' + not + first form of main verb + other wordsAuxiliary Verb 'Does' is used with subject 'He and She' + All Singular Subjects. Auxiliary verb 'do' is used with subject 'I, We, You and They' + All Plural Subjects. Examples:He/She does not talk. I/we/you/they do not talk.

Most buses do not cater to interior parts of the villages. He does not know what to say. Affirmative pattern -subject + first form of main verb + other wordsSingular Verb is used with subject 'He and She' + All Singular Subjects. Plural verb is used with subject 'I, We, You and They' + All Plural Subjects. Examples:He/She talks.

Using Tenses in English: Past, Present, Future English Daily Use Book 15 #ad - I/we/you/They talk. We seek opportunity to chart out our own course. Lean margin of victory or defeat gives an impression of a tough contest. Nowadays, voters value development over other issues. They want civic amenities and employment opportunities. B. This book covers the following topics: what are "tenses"?agreement between subject and verbtwenty-four auxiliary verbsregular and irregular verbspresent tensepresent indefinite tensepresent continuous/progressive tensepresent perfect tensepresent Perfect Continuous/Progressive TensePAST TENSEPast Indefinite TensePast Continuous/Progressive TensePast Perfect TensePast Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseFUTURE TENSEFuture Indefinite TenseFuture Continuous/Progressive TenseFuture Perfect TenseFuture Perfect Continuous/Progressive TenseUseful NotesExercisesSample This:Tenses could be defined as "any of the form of a verb that may be used to show the time of the action or an event or state expressed by the verb".

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Dictionary of Category Words: Vocabulary Building English Word Power Book 12

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Manik Joshi #ad - Category words -- Fabrics25. Category words -- Ways of Saying Something09. Category words -- Feelings12. Category words -- Ways of Walking04. Category words -- Zodiac Sign and Birthstones24. Clap -- the sound of hitting something by hand | sudden loud noiseExamples: Clapping of Hands | Clapping of Thunder12. Category words -- Government32.

Category words -- Ways of Continuing11. Babble -- the sound of many people speaking all togetherExample: Babble of Voices02. Category words -- Nature27B. Category words -- Ways of Seeing08. Creak -- a series of sharp soundsExamples: Creaking of a Whip | Creaking of Shoes15. Category words -- People and Family29.

Dictionary of Category Words: Vocabulary Building English Word Power Book 12 #ad - Explode -- to make loud, violent soundExamples: Exploding of Guns | Exploding of Bombs | Exploding of Rocket18. Beat -- sound made by a series of regular blows to somethingExamples: Beating of Drums | Beating of Wings04. Category words -- Religion27A. Crackle -- a series of light sharp soundsExamples: Crackling of Fire-Wood | Crackling of Gunfire | Crackling of Flames14.

Bang -- sudden loud noiseExample: Bang of a Gun03. Blast -- the sound of an explosion | sound made by blowing of musical instrumentsExamples: Blast of a Bomb | Blast of a siren05.

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Make Your Writing Flow: A Practical Guide to Transitional Words and Phrases

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Innerscape Publishing #ad - Take your writing to the next level with this Invaluable Reference Tool!For many aspiring writers, one of the biggest obstacles they face is the ability to write flowing sentences and paragraphs. Fortunately, this skill can be taught, and is the subject of this book. Ryan deane has compiled a transitional words and phrases reference unlike anything ever published.

This book is filled to the brim with words and phrases to help you build compelling sentences and paragraphs that will keep your readers thoroughly engaged. Inside you'll discover:# over 1, 100 transitional words and phrases sorted into 34 categories. Example sentences showing how to use each transition in your own writing.

Make Your Writing Flow: A Practical Guide to Transitional Words and Phrases #ad - Detailed table of contents for easy access to each entry. Make your writing flow: a practical guide to Transitional Words and Phrases' is a must have book for any writer who wants to take their writing to the next level. How many times have you read a piece of writing and felt jarred by a poorly constructed passage? Trust me, you're not alone.

The talent to string thoughts and ideas together in a way that's pleasing to a reader is what separates an amateur writer from a professional.

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Transitional Words and Phrases: Using Transitional Expressions

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#ad - Transitional Expressions -- Emphasis10 Transitional expressions -- timeexercise: 1a and 1bexercise: 2a to 2csample this:transitional expressions -- definitionmeaning of 'transition' -- to go from one point to another"Transitional Expressions" = "Transitional Words" + "Transitional Phrases""Transitional or Transition Words" are also known as "connecting words", "linking phrases" or "signal phrases""Transitional Expressions" also "Transitions" could be defined as follows:*'Transitional expressions' are words or phrases that provide bridges between sentences, parts of sentences, "linking words" or "signal words""Transitional or Transition Phrases" are also known as "connecting phrases", paragraphs and sections.

Transitional expressions' connect and relate sentences and paragraphs. Transitions expressions' signal the relationship between sentences and paragraphs. Transitions expressions' state the connections between ideas. Transitions expressions' help carry over a thought from one part of a sentence to another, from one sentence to another, from one section to another, from one paragraph to another, or from one idea to another.

Transitional Words and Phrases: Using Transitional Expressions #ad - Transitional expressions' connect ideas from sentence to sentence and paragraph to paragraph. Transitional expressions' are placed in the beginning, middle, or end of the sentences/paragraphs to explain connections between two or more ideas. Transitional expressions' produce clearer expression, by eliminating the excessive use of such words as 'and', 'or' 'so' 'yet', 'for' 'nor', 'but', etc.

Choosing transitional Expression --Some transitional words and transitional phrases belong to more than one category.

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Dictionary of Root Words: Greek and Latin Roots English Word Power Book 17

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Manik Joshi #ad - A root does not have a prefix a letter or group of letters added to the beginning of a word or a suffix a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word. Root is the primary lexical unit of a word, and of a word family. For example, pure is a root. Into a single total | related words: aggregation, acoustically, acousticsadama greek -- invincible | adamant adamantlyade greek -- enough | adequate adequacy, adequatelyadip latin -- fat | adiposeadolesc latin -- growing up | adolescent adolescence******other root words -- aroot word origin -- meaningaapt greek -- indomitable, acceptably, acetoneachr greek -- colorless | achromicacid latin -- sour | acidic, apolitical, acidify, alternation, atypicalablat latin -- remove | ablationablut Latin -- wash | ablutionsabort Latin -- born too soon | abortionabras Latin -- rub off | abrasion abrasive, abrasively, acceptable, toward | accept acceptability, acoustician, acceptance, aggregator******ALTR/ALTEROrigin: Latin | Meaning: otherExamples:altruism -- caring about the needs of other people | related word: altruisticalterable -- that can be changed | related word: unalterablealtercation -- noisy argumentalternate -- to follow one after other | related words: alternately, alternative******Some More Root Words -- ARoot Word Origin -- Meaning | Examples Related Words in Bracketa Greek -- not | atheism, abundantlyac Latin -- to, abrasivenessabstemi Latin -- controlled; moderate | abstemiousabund Latin -- overflow | abundance abundant, acidulate acidulation, acetic, acidulousacm Greek -- summit | acmeaco Greek -- relief | aconiteacous Greek -- hear | acoustic acoustical, acidosis, acceleratoracet Latin -- vinegar | acetate, acceptationacanth Greek -- thorn | acanthusacceler Latin -- hasten | accelerate acceleration, unfriendlyabact Latin -- driven awayabdit Latin -- secret/hiddenablep Greek -- loss of sightabr Greek -- delicateabscis Latin -- cutoffabsit Latin -- distantaca Greek -- a point; silenceacar Greek -- tiny .

By adding prefixes and suffixes, the following words could be made:impure, purenessSimilarly, purity, play and move are root words. What are "root words"?a root, or root word is a word which is used to form another word. By adding prefixes and suffixes, moved, mover, movinglyIn this book, played, playermoving, movement, playing, the following words could be made:plays, movable, I have given the most common Greek and Latin roots which are used in English language.

Dictionary of Root Words: Greek and Latin Roots English Word Power Book 17 #ad - Sample this:root words -- aab/absorigin: latin | meaning: away, abstention, absorbing, absurdly******aggorigin: latin | meaning: collectedexamples:agglomerate -- to collect things and form them into a mass or group | related word: agglomerationaggrandize -- to increase your importance or power | related word: aggrandizementaggregate -- to put together different items, absorbent, absorbency, abstraction, offExamples:abate -- to subsideabject -- hopelessabjure -- to renounceabnormal -- unusual | related words: abnormally, absorptionabstain -- to give up something for moral reason | related words: abstainer, abnormalityabroad -- out of the countryabscess -- swellingabscond -- to run away | related word: absconderabseil -- to go down a steep cliffabsence -- nonattendance | related words: absent, absentlyabsolve -- to forgiveabsorb -- to soak up | related words: absorbable, abstinenceabstemious -- criticalabstinent -- not having something for moral reasonabstract -- not real; theoretical | related words: abstracted, absorbance, absentee, abstractedly, abstractlyabstruse -- difficult to understand; obscureabsurd -- ridiculous | related words: absurdist, from, amounts, absorbed, absurdity, absenteeism, absentia, etc.

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